STEMinist Profile: Taryn Musgrave, Chief Operations Officer for Robogals Global

2014-tarynmusgrave

Taryn Musgrave

Chief Operations Office & Full Time Student

Robogals Global


What inspired you to pursue a career in STEM?
I just LOVE technology and maths! I always wanted to do something a little bit different and I love being able to solve problems. When I was younger I didn’t really know what I wanted to do… I wanted to work with computers but I didn’t have much thought beyond that. I ended up in an Engineering role and have since then come full circle back to Computer Science. I have always been an advocate of women in STEM roles and I am involved in promoting women in STEM roles as part of my role. I think when a maths problem, an engineering marvel, a physics discovery or a particularly tricky code solution gets you excited you have no choice! I have found my passion.

What is the coolest project you have worked on and why?
There have been plenty of cool projects along the way. Each project is different: different challenges and different people. One of the coolest projects was when I was living in Northern Australia. A train had derailed and destroyed a section of track and a point machine. I was on a team of two and we spent the next 12 hours rebuilding this machine from scratch. It involved physical labour, resourceful thinking, problem solving and teamwork to be able to get this machine up and running again. This project gave me a sense of achievement when the machine first operated.

Generally speaking my favourite projects are the ones that have an unexpected outcome and help people. I am a big advocate for volunteering and helping people as much as possible. Sharing knowledge and skills with others develops not only them but myself as well.

Role models and heroes:

  • Amy Poehler – just plain inspirational
  • Helen Pederson – for helping me find the confidence to pursue my dreams. Her Open the Door project provides education and aims to address the issues women face in the engineering industry when returning to the workforce after having children.
  • Karen San Miguel – a fantastic woman who promotes tech to young people through CoderDojo in WA. Also an all-round awesome person.
  • Marita Cheng – founder of Robogals. I would not have the wonderful opportunity I have now if Marita didn’t get the ball rolling.
  • My Husband – he is so patient, kind and supportive. He is such a positive male role model. I am so lucky to have him in my life.

Why do you loving working in STEM?
Every day is different! I love to help people and solve problems. In my current role I get to visit schools and encourage girls to think about STEM as a potential career path. There is nothing more exciting than a group of young girls who never knew that their love of maths and science could be part of their future career. The girls that I meet surprise me every time. Their ingenuity and ‘out of the box’ thinking just blows me away. I meet so many older women who have lost that along the way and I want to encourage everyone to become themselves again. Through my different jobs in STEM I have been knee deep in snow fixing track circuits on the railway in England, responding to faults in Northern Australia in temperatures that melted my work boots, and currently sharing the awesome places STEM careers can take you with girls around the world.

Advice for future STEMinists?
Jump! If you find something you love doing, then do it! Happy people are successful people. Work takes up a substantial part of your life so it is important to love what you are doing. If you make a mistake, you learn. If you chose the wrong path, you can change it. Nothing is set in stone.

Favorite website or app:

  • Twitter – I love to tweet! Twitter connects me with the world and lets me discover so many new people :)
  • Slack – Newly discovered. It allows me to keep up with my team on a regular informal basis.

Twitter: @tarynmusgrave

No Surprises at Amazon

This week Amazon became the latest company to join the craze of releasing diversity statistics. While disappointing, the presented figures weren’t at all unexpected, as Amazon joined the other tech giants in displaying a vastly un-diverse picture on their diversity report.

Over a month after the company was pressed by Rev. Jesse Jackson’s Rainbow Push Coalition and publications like USA Today to release race and gender breakdowns of its workforce, Amazon quietly responded by posting a page on their website about various diversity initiatives the company is involved with. No official announcement was made by Amazon management about the numbers, and corporate spokespeople have been silent in response to questions about the figures.

amazon-1

amazon-2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

amazon-3

amazon-4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For us at STEMinist, the overwhelming majority of men in the company –especially in managerial positions where just 25% are women– is especially troubling when considering the fact that this is for the company overall. Unlike other tech diversity reports seen in recent months, Amazon chose not to disclose the diversity numbers for its technical staff, which are undoubtedly even more dismal.

While Amazon does sport internal “affinity groups” like AWE (Amazon Women in Engineering), this doesn’t make up for the disparity in proportions. There was no time lost by Amazon in avoiding blame for that problem, declaring it as something that begins in schools.

“We know that in middle school and high school, students are already deciding what professions they want to pursue,” stated Amazon’s report. “More often than not female students and students of color are opting out of technology and engineering.”

They propose to be part of the solution by pumping money and resources into organizations focused on improving the “pipeline” for STEM minorities.

“To broaden our impact, we partner with the Anita Borg Institute to sponsor events such as the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing. We also provide resources and volunteers to Code.org to increase access to computing in high school, and we host Girls Who Code to provide hands-on coding education. We actively assist these students to enroll in national programs such as Aspirations in Computing with the National Center for Women & Information Technology.”

While every effort made is something to be celebrated and appreciated, only time (and their next diversity report) will tell if Amazon truly stands behind their commitment to inclusion.

 

 

STEMinist Profile: Erica Moulton, Marine Technology/Owner

2511_72895716935_3055627_n

Erica Moulton

Marine Technology/Owner

PVC ROV


What inspired you to pursue a career in STEM?
I think I knew when I was 4 that I wanted to work in the science field. Of course I was enamored by Jacques Cousteau, but I was also inspired by the physics of what Evel Knievel was doing on a motorcycle and the adventures of Marlin Perkins on Wild Kingdom. Whatever I could watch on evening television would inspire me to explore and build outside everyday. I built rockets with my friends, explored the mangrove estuary around my home, didn’t come home until the street lights came on – I think being a kid in the “free to be a kid outside” 1970’s is overall what inspired me to keep going in the STEM field. I try to inspire the same wanderlust in my own children through travel and exploration.

What is the coolest project you have worked on and why?
Coolest? That would easily go to an experiment fondly called Fish In Space. Three colleagues and I applied to have an aquaculture experiment on-board Space Shuttle Mission STS -95 (when John Glenn returned to space). It was accepted – and we learned a bit about the potential to grow Tilapia on future space missions. Second coolest? Building my first simple ROV and underwater camera system. Why? It was proof of my mastery of simple electrical skills – a mastery that has continued for over 10 years allowing me to teach hundreds of others basic electrical and waterproofing skills – enabling them to work, create and explore the underwater world.

Role models and heroes:
My role models and heroes? I don’t have specific people or characters in this category. Well not famous ones – I see the women I know personally – they understand that it takes a village – it’s those who are married, or single mom or maybe have a partner, have families, work in STEM, have balance, who say no to some things – who contribute to the world and to each other – those are my role models.

Why do you loving working in STEM?
I love working in STEM for a lot of reasons, but my favorite one? I love working in STEM because it allows me the opportunity to engage other people in STEM activities. I love to break down barriers to participation, teaching in ways that people like to learn and demonstrating that we use many facets of STEM on a daily basis without even realizing it!

Advice for future STEMinists?
Support other women! Be a sponsor, be a mentor – not a covert competitor.

Favorite website or app:
FabFems role models

Twitter: @ROV_Erica

Site: pvcrov.wix.com/pvcrov