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STEMinist Profile: Jin K. Montclare, Associate Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

Jin K. Montclare

Associate Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

Polytechnic Institute of New York University



What inspired you to pursue a career in STEM?
While I was always interested in science and math as a young girl, it was through the encouragement of my teachers, mentors and family that led me to my career. I was really fortunate to have had a number of wonderful teachers and mentors throughout my life who cheered me on even when there were times I had doubts about my path.

What is the coolest project you have worked on and why?
The beauty about my job is that I am constantly engaged in cool projects with new discoveries and data. Right now, the project that has been occupying my mind has been our “smart biomaterials” work. My students and I designed and fabricated engineered proteins that are comprised of two parts: one that can form a cylinder for binding small molecules/drugs (derived from a coiled coiled protein) and another that can assemble/disassemble as function of temperature (from elastin).

When fused, the resulting hybrid proteins self-assemble into nanoparticles that can encapsulate drugs and upon sensing a particular temperature, trigger aggregation and release. These materials have interesting implications in medicine and drug delivery.

Role models and heroes:
I believe I have been extremely fortunate to have in my life a set of role models (both men and women) that have played a significant role in shaping my career. These include my teachers, professors, advisors and colleagues. However, the most influential role model in my life has been my grandmother. She was a living example of persistence, diligence and character.

She had lost her husband and had to raise four very young children while working as a nurse at an orphanage. Through sheer determination, she was able to successfully raise her children into adulthood as well as help raise me and my brother. She was the one who came over to the US and sent money to bring all her children over. Her strength during her incredible life has been a source of support for me and when I am in a predicament, I draw from her strength.

Why do you loving working in STEM?
I love working in STEM as what I do as a scientist/engineer and educator can really make a difference in the world. The research on the proteins we fabricate in the lab have implications in medicine, electronics, energy and the environment. The lessons I teach can inspire the next generation of scientist/engineers.

Advice for future STEMinists?
My advice to others is to follow your passion and surround yourself with support. I fully recognize that the STEM path is not easy, but I can attest that it is rewarding. While there may be individuals who may question or belittle your decisions in pursuing STEM, I suggest you develop selective hearing in which you simply tune down those individuals and tune those who support you.

Favorite website or app:
Twitter, Evernote, Lewis Dots (our chemistry app)

Twitter: @jkmontclare

Site: Tumblr, Faculty page, Facebook, Research Lab

Profiles

STEMinist Profile: Kari L. Jordan, Graduate Research Associate, Engineering Education

Kari Jordan

Kari L. Jordan

Graduate Research Associate

The Ohio State University Engineering Education Innovation Center



What inspired you to pursue a career in STEM?
I received B.S. and M.S. degrees in Mechanical Engineering and am currently a Doctoral Candidate in Engineering Education. I was inspired by my father. He works for Ford Motor Company as President of the UAW. I grew up around cars, and my mother even allowed me to participate in the Detroit Area Pre-College Engineering Program (DAPCEP). Because of my parents’ encouragement I attended the Minorities in Engineering summer program at Michigan Tech University while I was in High School. I went on to receive two degrees from Michigan Tech and this December I’ll be done with my PhD from Ohio State!

What is the coolest project you have worked on and why?
The coolest project I worked on was developing a flow model to predict pressure drop in a diesel fuel system. I did this when I interned at Ford Motor Company. This project was cool because it allowed me to use the skills I learned in my Fluid Mechanics class. I also had a chance to work with my hands in the fuel lab.

Role models and heroes:
My role models are my parents, Dr. Njema Frazier, and the “Chicago Six”. My parents are my role models because they have supported me throughout my long tenure in school and I’ve watched them overcome obstacles I would not have been able to overcome. Dr. Njema Frazier is a nuclear physicist I’ve grown to know and love through our work with the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE). She is the most passionate woman I know and she’s a genius! The “Chicago Six” are the founders of NSBE and they’re my heroes because I would not have made it through the engineering program without NSBE. My ultimate hero is Jesus Christ. Enough said!

Why do you loving working in STEM?
I love working in STEM because a career in STEM will launch you into any career in the world: business, music, fashion, medicine, law, the list goes on. You can literally do anything you want with a STEM degree. Not many people have that privilege.

Advice for future STEMinists?
My advice for future STEMinist is to join some type of mentoring circle. You will not make it through any STEM program by yourself. You are not an island!

Favorite website or app:
My favorite website is www.zumba.com. I am a licensed Zumba instructor and I’m always on our website looking for new music and gear to wear in my classes! My favorite app right now is Instagram. I’m a bit addicted to posting random photos!

Twitter: @elle_kari

Site: www.iamkarielle.com

Profiles

STEMinist Profile: Karin Remington, Chief Technology and Science Officer

Kate Remington

Karin Remington

Chief Technology and Science Officer

Arjuna Solutions



What inspired you to pursue a career in STEM?
I was quick at learning math facts as a kid, and with that head start, I lucked into seeing more advanced mathematics, starting with algebra, with the eyes of a kid: solving equations seemed like a fun game to me. In college and graduate school, I was challenged and humbled – but started seeing how my math courses helped with my science courses, and vice versa, and how my “game” way of thinking (which I now realize was developing ‘algorithms’) was really a bridge to computer science.

I don’t know that I was “pursuing a career in STEM” – I just kept finding ways to stay involved with something that seemed like play.

What is the coolest project you have worked on and why?
Best project ever: Genome assembly of the fruit fly. I was part of a small group at a start-up company called Celera Genomics that was banking on us being able to apply “whole-genome shotgun sequencing” to eventually obtain the sequence of the human genome. The fruit fly was our test case. We in the computer science group (which we called the “Assembly Team”) all were so excited by the challenge, knowing that if we could assemble the fruit fly genome, we’d be able to assemble the human genome as well. We worked long, long hours, but we all enjoyed a sense of shared mission and camaraderie.

We were in a set of cubicles, and would talk over the partitions, to troubleshoot problems. We’d meet in a “war-room” several times a week to make sure we were all going in the same direction. And we were able to cheer (literally) when the genome finally came together. The guys I worked with on this project are still my dear friends. Many of us have worked together on later projects, all very very cool, but this project really brought us all together with a huge challenge, and forged friendships and ideals that will last a lifetime.

Role models and heroes:
J.Craig Venter: I worked with Craig for many years, and love his amazing ability to take an intuition or idea and turn it into a project with resources and shared enthusiasm to reach the targeted goal.

Jeremy Berg: Jeremy led the NIH’s National Institute of General Medical Sciences from 2003-2011, His training is in chemistry, but he was an active champion of computational biology, informatics, and mathematics at NIH during his tenure. He recently joined Pitt, and is leading its newly established “Institute of Personalized Medicine.”

Jill Mesirov: Jill is director of Computational Biology and Bioinformatics at the Broad Institute, and is an accomplished researcher in the fields of bioinformatics, genomics and computational biology. She’s got a great research program, and also finds time to speak with a strong voice on many committees that significantly influence federal research directions.

Why do you loving working in STEM?
I enjoy being able to indulge in play while I work. Developing algorithms seems like play to me, so when that is my agenda for the day, I am really happy.

Advice for future STEMinists?
Network!

Particularly with other women in STEM fields. And across levels… don’t be shy to approach funding agencies, etc.

I’ve had a number of projects where all seemed lost, but the women involved were the force that made things turn around to success.

Favorite website or app:
google.com

Twitter: @remingka

Profiles

STEMinist Profile: Tatiana Aires Tavares, Computer Science Professor / Researcher

Tatiana Aires Tavares

Computer Science Professor / Researcher

Federal University of Paraiba / SUNY Oswego



What inspired you to pursue a career in STEM?
Well, I was always a curious child. I liked to play with things I could create. For example, I remember that I loved to play playmobils with my cousin. We could create our own stories and toys. But I was really introduced to science in my high school. My lab classes were amazing to me. At the same time I was introduced to computing. A basic programming course in DBASE III taught me of things that I could create with a machine. I discovered that I could create in the machine variables, reserved words and programs. Wow! The result was my decision to pursue a degree in Computer Science (1998).

But it was not enough…my master’s degree in Computer Systems came soon after (2001). And then the PhD was the next step (2004). In the beginning a PhD in Electrical Engineering was a little scary, but before as I could imagine the “mission impossible” became a “mission accomplished.” I realized that I could have a career in science when I was at a university teaching science. I was surprised by my academic performance in science. It seemed like a Peter Pan experience; just like when I was a child, I could be curious and create things. Awesome!

What is the coolest project you have worked on and why?
It’s a hard question. Each research project that I have participated in during a decade career span (better forget the time!) was unique, special and a leading growing experience. In Computer Science, we define a project as a unique experience. And that is it! Each project has its own team, ideas, problems, technologies and solution. Computer scientists are always running after the best solutions.

An example of a good solution was ICSpace. ICSpace (or Internet Cultural Space) was a project that I worked on for almost 3 years. More than 20 people worked on this project: computer scientists, artists, engineers, educators. We created and built a virtual shared space. We put together robots, real visitors and avatars. The best result of this project was to teach that computing scientists could work in art galleries and think out of the box.

Talking about cool projects, I remembered the Arthron tool. Arthron was created and developed during GTMDA project. GTMDA project was supported and funded by RNP (Brazilian National Education and Research Network). This research project was also the first approved project coordinated by me. GTMDA involved a great team of professionals and students. The solution (Arthron) is used for artists to create their own plays. Arthron is a software that manipulates video streams used in telematic dance shows. Putting together computer scientists and artists was a singular experience. Sometimes the artists were programming while the programmers were dancing.

But, as computing scientists, we can do better than developing solutions, we can teach people how to create their own solutions. More than a social aspect – so important to digital inclusion at Brazil- this kind of project tests our capacity to multiply knowledge. And, science is made to be multiplied. Last year we worked in a poor community nearby the university at Joao Pessoa. Ms. Zeza is a special lady who takes care of the community children; she believes that studying is the best way to rescue children from poverty and drugs. We bought her idea; me and 8 computer science students introduced the computer to almost 40 children between 7 and 14 years old. It was a rich experience for everyone.

Role models and heroes:
I preferred a feminist heroine – Wonder Woman. The Wonder Woman who showed me that beauty, brains and strength can work together, and science needs all of them.

One of my role models was my undergraduate advisor, Ms. Eliane Diniz, who showed me that science is done with bravery and heart. Bravery to go beyond the classroom, to fight for improvements for all in difficult times; heart to feel how to extract what each one does best.

My PhD advisors, Mr. Lemos and Mr. Gonçalves, were my other role models; they showed me that science is done with hard work and passion (yeahhh!). Hard work to develop our own solutions for non trivial problems. Passion, because pleasure causes us to work hard.

Finally, my project partner, Ms. Zeza, showed me that science is altruistic. Science is done for the collective benefit to change society for the better.

Why do you loving working in STEM?
Freedom is the first word that comes to my mind; freedom to think about things that most people don’t have the time to even consider. We can spend days, weeks, months or years making and answering our own questions. We can always change. Changes are always welcome! We can put together people to think with us because two heads are better then one! Working in STEM allows us to build our own creations and observe how the world appropriates it. It is a rich, interactive and fascinating process!

Advice for future STEMinists?
Working hard you can go far. It is really true. Enjoy Math, Physics and Logic! Look at the difficulties as great opportunities. Remember that challenges are always welcome. A mission that seems impossible with hard work, becomes a mission accomplished. Somewhere in time, someone used magic words to me: “You can not …”. I took it as a challenge and a great opportunity to say, “Yes, I can ..” and here I am. Yes, YOU can ☺

Favorite website or app:
The Internet is full of nice things. Enjoy it!

Twitter: @tatiaires

Site: http://tatiana.lavid.ufpb.br/

Profiles

STEMinist Profile: Joanne Kamens, Executive Director, Addgene

Joanne Kamens

Executive Director

Addgene, a non-profit biotech



What inspired you to pursue a career in STEM?
How could I not? I was a scientist early on and never lost the bug. Maybe the interest in biology started with my crazy but excellent biology teacher in 10th grade and learning about Mendel’s peas in genetics, but I was a serious math geek long before that.

What is the coolest project you have worked on and why?
I have had a long and varied career at work and exciting volunteer experiences as well. I guess my coolest work project is my current one–Addgene. Addgene is a non-profit repository for research reagents called plasmids. We help life scientists all over the world share their plasmids for their experiments. Addgene started small but now has over 20,000 plasmids in our library and sends out over 350 a day all over the world! My coolest non-work project was starting the Massachusetts chapter of the Association for Women in Science (AWIS) and watching it grow to over 300 active members.

Role models and heroes:
There are so many cool women and scientists out there–I have a new hero every day. Today my hero is one of the admins in our office. She went to a conference and watched Arianna Huffington of The Huffington Post speak and then emailed her. Ms. Huffington invited her to write a blog for The Post. I have a soft spot for Ada Lovelace…one of the founders in computing and I am related to Millie Koss, another leading woman in tech who recently passed away. I could go on and on.

Why do you loving working in STEM?
Who wouldn’t? I don’t do science, I am a scientist. Of course I love it.

Advice for future STEMinists?
Be bold. Find mentors – lots of mentors. Ask for help and pay it forward when you get it.

Favorite website or app:
Has to be my site www.addgene.org but I also admire Constant Contact and must admit a soft spot for the ever amazing Google.

Twitter: @jkamens

Site: www.linkedin.com/in/joannekamens

Profiles

STEMinist Profile: Deborah Resnick, Technical Services Manager/Systems Administrator

Deborah Resnick

Technical Services Manager/Systems Administrator

Purdue Intercollegiate Athletics



What inspired you to pursue a career in STEM?
I have always been fascinated by science and technology – I was the only girl in my high school aeronautics class. It was practicality that led me to my STEM career, though. My husband and I sat down one day and discussed what we liked to do and who would make more doing it. I won. I discovered several years previously that I had an aptitude for computers. In 15 years I’ve gone from knowing virtually nothing about computers to being a systems administrator and technology manager at a Big 10 university. It’s been amazing!

What is the coolest project you have worked on and why?
The coolest project I’ve worked on has been moving the support for game day stats in house. It seemed like a simple and straightforward project, but as in all things tech, it was so much more under the surface. It’s been amazing to see how the hardware, software, people, networks, and the Internet all come together to put that little line of sports statistics across the bottom of my television screen during a Boilermaker sporting event. I still get a little thrill each time the stats start working at each game or meet!

Role models and heroes:
My primary role model is Amelia Earhart. Such an amazing and independent woman! I would also have to say my mother, but I didn’t realize that until recently. She was a working mom when there were very few to be found. She was a nurse, who lived to care for people. In order to become a nurse (it was 1954) she locked herself in her bedroom until her parents agreed to let her go to nursing school! The independence and ambition of both of these women are what has kept me going throughout my life.

Why do you loving working in STEM?
Possibilities. It’s not so much about what is, but what could be. There’s a huge world out there that is just beyond what we can see. I love being able to show people what’s possible, and it’s always a thrill when those people start seeing the possibilities themselves. I think that one of the things I love most in my current position is the way someone’s eyes light up when I’m telling her about something and that child-like wonder shines through.

Advice for future STEMinists?
Don’t listen to people who say you can’t do something. You can do anything you can imagine. The only limits on you are those you place on yourself. Some things just take a lot more work – so do the work!

Favorite website or app:
My current favorite is really more of a concept. I love the cloud. Any cloud will do. I use several cloud services and I feel so much more free. No need to carry around my laptop – I can use a tablet or my phone and see any document I’ve got stored in the cloud. I currently use Google Drive most frequently, but I also like Dropbox.

My favorite app right now is IQTELL. It’s a great organizing tool. The interface is a bit busy, but it’s just in beta and testers can suggest modifications.

Twitter: @DebResnick

Site: www.deborahresnick.com

Profiles

STEMinist Profile: Ty Darensburg, Educational Analyst

Ty Darensburg, MS

Educational Analyst

Recovery School District, New Orleans



What inspired you to pursue a career in STEM?
I found my way to a STEM major accidentally. I started off in college as a Political Science/Pre-Law major, but was talking Calculus III as an elective because I registered late. My Calculus III instructor convinced me to consider changing my major to Mathematics. I did, and the rest is history. went on to get my Master’s degree in Biostatistics, worked in the education field for over 10 years, and finally found a way to combine my passion for education with my background in analysis.

What is the coolest project you have worked on and why?
I did an internship with the CDC when I first graduated from college. They allowed me to pick my own project and I did a study on PTSD and depression among Buffalo, NY police officers. It was my first time analyzing such a large data set, and my first publication as first author. I looked at differences based on gender, experience, age, etc. It was really exciting, and a glimpse into what I could do with data.

Role models/heroes:
My mom is my role model. She started out working at McDonalds, and through hard work and dedication, she earned her Bachelor’s degree after having 3 children, and now she travels the world and manages clinical trials. She showed me what it’s like to have a vision for your life, and achieve it no matter how the odds are stacked up against you. She made me feel like I could do or be anything when I was growing up.

Why do you love working in STEM?
I love working in STEM because it’s challenging, exciting, and there’s no limit to what you can do.

Advice for future STEMinists?
“Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure…” -Marianne Williamson

My advice to you is to work hard in your Math & Science classes; look at them with new eyes and take opportunities for enrichment in STEM fields. Don’t let anyone make you feel like you can’t do something or you’re in any way inferior. One of my really good friends always told me, “Don’t tell yourself no, let someone else tell you no.” For example, don’t say I’m not going to apply for this program, because I’m not going to get in. Apply, and let them decide. They might say yes or no. It’s your job to keep pushing until you get a yes, and I’m telling you that you will get a yes.

Favorite website/app: Too many to name.

Twitter: @TyeSquared

Profiles

STEMinist Profile: Maria Felice, Research Engineer, University of Bristol

Maria Felice

Research Engineer

University of Bristol / Rolls-Royce Plc.



What inspired you to pursue a career in STEM?
I loved maths and wanted a job that involved people and solving problems.

What is the coolest project you have worked on and why?
My undergraduate final year project because I saw it go from start to finish.

Role models/heroes:
Too many to mention, but a lot of my fellow Girl Geek Dinner Attendees.

Why do you love working in STEM?
I get to solve real world problems.

Advice for future STEMinists?
Do what you enjoy. Don’t worry about moving around sectors and embrace your gender but don’t give it too much thought!

Favorite website/app: Twitter!

Twitter: @maria_engineer

Profiles

STEMinist Profile: Kristen Sager Cincotta, Neuroscience Ph.D. Graduate

Kristen Sager Cincotta

Occupation: ORISE fellow/guest public health policy researcher

Organization: CDC



What inspired you to pursue a career in STEM?
I liked learning about how things work, especially within the body, and I loved my science classes in grade school. Science felt more like playing than my other classes, which were mostly memorizing and regurgitating things. When I realized that I could have a career in science that might actually help us solve some of the greatest problems facing the world today, instead of helping someone else make money selling something, I was all in.

What is the coolest project you have worked on and why?
My graduate work all focused on Alzheimer’s Disease, and in particular, a receptor protein that appears to manipulate the production of ABeta, the primary component of amyloid plaques. At one point, I got to work on a project attempting to identify novel compounds that could interact with and redirect my receptor around the cell, thus giving us a way to control ABeta production.

It was a highly translational project that could have significant ramifications for our ability to treat, or more likely, to prevent Alzheimer’s disease in patients. I found it very exciting to be working on something with that type of applicability to a very real problem. Plus, I got to use some seriously cool robotics in setting up the high throughput compound screenings!

Role models/heroes:
My undergraduate advisor, Dr. Jean Hardwick and the women of the Ithaca College Biology Department who showed me that women can run not just their own labs, but entire scientific departments. Mary Lasker, Nancy Brinker, and Laura Ziskin, who all identified important gaps in our public health system (especially regarding cancer) and worked (or are working) to do something about it. My mother, whose strength and resolve in living her life with Stage IV breast cancer is a daily reminder that some things are worth fighting for.

Why do you love working in STEM?
Because it’s fun and it’s important in equal measure. Scientists get to play with interesting equipment and techniques, see things most people never do, and spend days and weeks thinking about and trying to answer questions that most people don’t have the time to even consider. And scientists have the ability to change the world for the better.

Advice for future STEMinists?
Support each other, especially up-and-coming women in science. For whatever reason, women in STEM can be very judgmental of their fellow STEMinists. It almost feels like there’s an unspoken belief that if we broaden the field to allow more women in, we will be diminishing the accomplishments of the STEMinist trail blazers that went before us. It’s a weird paradox that I was disheartened to discover. We should be opening our arms and supporting all women in STEM, not self-selecting those we feel are the “right” type of female scientist.

Favorite website/app:
Twitter – it’s my news feed and communications outlet all in one!

Website: www.KristenCincotta.com
Twitter: @kscincotta

Profiles

STEMinist Profile: Meagan Pollock, Engineering Education Consultant, Doctoral Candidate

Meagan Pollock

Engineering Education Consultant, Doctoral Candidate

Meagan Pollock Consulting, Purdue University



What inspired you to pursue a career in STEM?
At 18, I sat in the biology lab chatting about the future with one of my favorite teachers, Mrs. Reeves. A quiet interruption, my other favorite teacher, Mrs. Estes, walks in from the chemistry lab to speak with Mrs. Reeves. Pardoning the interruption, she began to describe this program that Texas Instruments (TI) was trying to begin to encourage women to become engineers. You see, her cousin worked as a professor at Texas Woman’s University (TWU), and was involved with writing the grant and proposing the program. The objective of the program was to offer fellowships to math and computer science majors at TWU to then encourage them to pursue a master’s level degree in electrical engineering. All the while, having a partnership with TI throughout their education for internship experience.

Mrs. Estes said to me, “Meagan, you’d be a perfect candidate for this program!” I laughed without a second thought (why would I want to go to a women’s university?!) and excused myself from the room. About half-way down the hall I stopped dead in my tracks… I’d applied to a dozen schools, been accepted with mediocre scholarships for education and interior design, fields I had no true to desire to pursue… It was as if time froze and forced me to reconsider. As I turned around there stood Mrs. Estes at the door. Before I could utter a word, she said, “My cousin’s name is Dr. Hargrave.”

I called TWU and the grant hadn’t gone through yet, so they weren’t considering applicants. Being a somewhat ambitious overachiever, I made my own application, essay included, and sent it to TWU. Within a few weeks, after a couple of follow-up phone calls, the department invited me to come visit the campus and meet the professors of the department. After touring a while, we settled in the department chair’s office to wrap up the visit. Dr. Edwards finished typing something and it began to print. He handed me a letter in which I then read silently. It was a letter offering me a full-ride to TWU. Dr. Edwards replied, “Meagan, we don’t have the money from the TI grant yet, but we want you to join us here and will make certain you are taken care of.” Graciously, I accepted… and the rest is history.

In summary, even though I liked math, science, and computer science, I never considered a career in these fields until I was encouraged by a teacher, and provided the opportunity to pursue a future in STEM through a scholarship. Educators, parents, and STEM professionals alike have a tremendous responsibility to encourage young women to consider careers in engineering, technology, as well as science and math. In addition, we can work together to break down barriers and build pathways for young women in STEM.

What is the coolest project you have worked on and why?
Coolest Engineering Project: My master’s thesis (2007) and subsequent research while practicing as an engineer was a study of the permeation & diffusion of moisture through the window bondline adhesive for the digital micromirror device (DMD), the key component in the Digital Light Processing (DLP) system. You are probably most familiar with this technology at your local digital cinema, but there are also incredible applications for medical devices that help people! The DLP projection system is comprised of a light source, optics, signal formatting processors and electronics, a color application (color wheel, LEDs, or lasers), and the DMD device. My research study learning about how moisture permeates and affects the DMD helped to enable new markets for DLP in smaller devices like cell phones, and portable medical devices.

Coolest Engineering Education Project: My dissertation research is a multiple case study analysis of high school females’ experiences in engineering, with consideration of the influences of their gender, race, and class. The literature identifies that gender, race, and class influences experiences, and that this intersection is important to understand. However, it has not been explored among females in high school engineering. Insights gleaned from case studies can directly influence policy, procedures, future research, as well as improve or enhance learning and teaching. The goal of the study is to richly describe the diversity of females’ experiences in engineering. Then, a cross-case analysis of the participants will provide a stronger and more compelling characterization, representative of the true diversity of experiences among high school females in engineering courses. The findings will inform curriculum developers and educators, improving the instruction of engineering for female students, and thus positively influencing the disparity in the field.

Role models/heroes:
Tegwin Pulley is a champion for diversity and has been a pioneer and advocate for women since the 60s. She is a role model and mentor to me for her commitment to the community, and to providing access, and equity for all.

Wanda Gass is a retired Fellow of Texas Instruments, and she was one of the first women to be named to this high technical distinction at TI. She excelled as a female engineer in an environment that was not welcoming to her. She is a role model and mentor.

Why do you love working in STEM?
Careers in STEM are exciting and diverse! As an engineer, I believe I am a trained problem solver and prepared to tackle almost anything. I love collaborating with smart and creative people, and I love knowing I am making a difference in the world!

Advice for future STEMinists?
Women make great engineers, and engineers are our future. Don’t be intimidated, and don’t give up! Encourage and support other women and girls in STEM, and believe that you can and will succeed, too. Finally, find a mentor and advocate to help you navigate your way, and don’t ever be afraid to ask for help!

Favorite website/app:
http://engineeryourlife.org/ – a guide to engineering for high school girls, with tools for parents and counselors too! See videos and read stories of real women engineers.

http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/science_careers.shtml – Want to know more about careers in science, technology, engineering, or math? Browse through detailed information on over 100 careers to discover what scientists really do and what it takes to prepare for these careers. Each career profile provides basic career information such as salary, job outlook, degree requirements, etc. They have also included videos featuring interviews with real scientists or on the job profiles.

http://www.teachengineering.org/ – The TeachEngineering digital library provides teacher- tested, standards-based engineering content for K-12 teachers to use in science and math classrooms. Engineering lessons connect real-world experiences with curricular content already taught in K-12 classrooms.

Website: www.MeaganPollock.com
Twitter: @MeaganPollock
Facebook: Engineering Equity in Education