That’s It — I’m Finished Defending Sexism In Tech

I wasn’t seeing the problems clearly because I’d been part of the industry for too long. I also wanted to focus on getting things done rather than on feminist-inspired activism. So I made the bros-only atmosphere work for me. I overcompensated by picking a frat boy to cofound a company with me (he was MIT & YC, by the way). I had the greatest time drinking scotch at Google I/O with some of the best CTOs in the media industry. They treated me like a bro. I didn’t want to lose those moments. And I thought that there was room for other women to have a similarly good experience.

[ via Business Insider ]

Children’s toys push girls out of STEM fields

Girls’ spatial learning development, career goals and even their perspective on life are all influenced by the toys they play with during early childhood. And although young women should absolutely be encouraged to enter the STEM fields after high school, attempting to garner their interest at age 18 might just be too little, too late.

[ via Iowa State Daily ]

6 Kids’ Clothing Lines That Know Your Daughter is More Than Just a Pink Princess Glitterbomb Who Can’t Do Math

It’s hard to get away from the idea of The Girl Section and The Boy Section despite the relatively few differences in prepubescent bodies. Progressively-minded parents can still be thwarted by school bullies and gender-policing fitting room attendants if they shop from the “wrong” section.

[ via Autostraddle ]

Harvard Case Study: Gender Equity

The country’s premier business training ground was trying to solve a seemingly intractable problem. Year after year, women who had arrived with the same test scores and grades as men fell behind. Attracting and retaining female professors was a losing battle; from 2006 to 2007, a third of the female junior faculty left.

[ via The New York Times ]

The Style Line interviews STEMinist founder Ann Hoang

The Style Line recently interviewed our founder Ann Hoang about how STEMinist got started and the importance of women in STEM.

Read the full interview here!

TechCrunch Disrupt Kicks Off with ‘Titstare’ App and Fake Masturbation

As a lovely followup to recent discussions of gender inclusivity in tech, here’s the first presentation from the AOL-owned TechCrunch Disrupt 2013 startup conference: an app called Titstare, presented by two grinning Australian dudes, exactly as tasteless as it sounds.

[ via Valleywag ]

Ambitious Women Face More Obstacles than Just Work-Life Balance

The truth is — as many have pointed out — that lots of ambitious people, male and female, make personal choices that take them off the path of leadership. It’s also true that women are often gently but firmly nudged off this path more frequently than men, when work and family invariably clash. And that is a problem. Not just for the women, but for the companies missing out on the benefits of diversity and the economy that’s not playing with a full talent deck.

[ via Harvard Business Review ]

7 Ways Companies Deter Women In Tech Jobs

It can be quite daunting for a woman to do six back-to-back interviews all with men. She doesn’t see anyone quite like her and it can be hard to identify with the company or see how she would fit in. I know several companies that require at least one woman to interview a prospective female candidate and I think it’s a good policy to have in place. If your startup is able, have every candidate, regardless of gender, interviewed by a woman on your team — it will help guard against bad hires.

[ via Business Insider ]

“Impostors” Downshift Career Goals

While both men and women suffer from impostor syndrome, more women than men experience it, says the study’s principal investigator, Jessica L. Collett, a sociologist at the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana, in an interview with Science Careers. Women also feel like impostors more frequently than men do, she says, and are more encumbered by it. “Impostorism is something that negatively affects both men and women, but it’s more pronounced among women, and therefore affects their career trajectories more,” she says.

[ via Science Magazine ]

Get more women into tech? My colleagues never got the memo

Even though I’ve done all the things I was supposed to do, I feel abandoned by this movement. In the face of growing female concern over women exiting the workforce, the only messages for young, female professionals are vague appeals to lean in, heed the warnings of the Opt-Out Generation, have it all some of the time or settle for some of those things most of the time. It’s depressing. What I really want to know is how to survive in the male-dominated engineering world, and no one seems to want to talk about that.

[ via New Statesman ]