Browsing Tag

mechanical

Profiles

STEMinist Profile: Kari L. Jordan, Graduate Research Associate, Engineering Education

Kari Jordan

Kari L. Jordan

Graduate Research Associate

The Ohio State University Engineering Education Innovation Center



What inspired you to pursue a career in STEM?
I received B.S. and M.S. degrees in Mechanical Engineering and am currently a Doctoral Candidate in Engineering Education. I was inspired by my father. He works for Ford Motor Company as President of the UAW. I grew up around cars, and my mother even allowed me to participate in the Detroit Area Pre-College Engineering Program (DAPCEP). Because of my parents’ encouragement I attended the Minorities in Engineering summer program at Michigan Tech University while I was in High School. I went on to receive two degrees from Michigan Tech and this December I’ll be done with my PhD from Ohio State!

What is the coolest project you have worked on and why?
The coolest project I worked on was developing a flow model to predict pressure drop in a diesel fuel system. I did this when I interned at Ford Motor Company. This project was cool because it allowed me to use the skills I learned in my Fluid Mechanics class. I also had a chance to work with my hands in the fuel lab.

Role models and heroes:
My role models are my parents, Dr. Njema Frazier, and the “Chicago Six”. My parents are my role models because they have supported me throughout my long tenure in school and I’ve watched them overcome obstacles I would not have been able to overcome. Dr. Njema Frazier is a nuclear physicist I’ve grown to know and love through our work with the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE). She is the most passionate woman I know and she’s a genius! The “Chicago Six” are the founders of NSBE and they’re my heroes because I would not have made it through the engineering program without NSBE. My ultimate hero is Jesus Christ. Enough said!

Why do you loving working in STEM?
I love working in STEM because a career in STEM will launch you into any career in the world: business, music, fashion, medicine, law, the list goes on. You can literally do anything you want with a STEM degree. Not many people have that privilege.

Advice for future STEMinists?
My advice for future STEMinist is to join some type of mentoring circle. You will not make it through any STEM program by yourself. You are not an island!

Favorite website or app:
My favorite website is www.zumba.com. I am a licensed Zumba instructor and I’m always on our website looking for new music and gear to wear in my classes! My favorite app right now is Instagram. I’m a bit addicted to posting random photos!

Twitter: @elle_kari

Site: www.iamkarielle.com

Profiles

STEMinist Profile: Dustyn Roberts, NSF Graduate Research Fellow

Dustyn Roberts

Dustyn Roberts

National Science Foundation
Graduate Research Fellow, Ph.D. Candidate

Polytechnic Institute of NYU


What inspired you to pursue a career in STEM?
My dad was an engineer and I was always good at math and science, so I chose a college with a strong engineering program. After a year or two I settled into mechanical and biomedical engineering and have really enjoyed it.

What is the coolest project you have worked on and why?
I got to work on part of the Mars Curiosity rover that’s currently on its way to Mars.

Role models/heroes:
Yoky Matsuoka.

Why do you love working in STEM?
The more I learn the more I understand how the world works, and my STEM based education gives met the ability to ask interesting questions and be able to answer them, both through theory and experiments.

Advice for future STEMinists?
Stay curious. Years of calculus can dull the spark in some budding engineers, but keep at it. Also, don’t let the male/female gender ratio get you down. Most men I know have a great deal of respect for women in engineering because they know we had to sometimes go through more to get where we are.

Favorite website or app:
HootSuite for managing social media, Adafruit Industries Circuit Playground for tech.

Twitter: @dustynrobots
Website: www.makingthingsmove.com

Profiles

STEMinist Profile: Michelle Hsia, Materials & Process Engineer

Michelle Hsia

Michelle T. Hsia

Materials & Process Engineer
Contract to Weber Aircraft, LLC



What inspired you to pursue a career in STEM?
Honestly, I wasn’t really sure what to do… My brother’s friends kind of pushed me into it since I was good at math and I loved science! I couldn’t figure out what to do that would actually make any money; I didn’t like history or political science or teaching. So, I decided to go into engineering. Then, it was basically a decision between Aerospace or Mechanical. Ultimately, I chose Mechanical.

What is the coolest project you have worked on and why?
In undergrad, it was the Formula SAE race car. We won the 2 years I was on the team. The 2nd year, I co-captained. It was an amazing experience; something that shaped my career. In industry, I performed a metallurgical root cause failure analysis on a test aircraft fuselage. It blew up during a test. After about a month and a half looking at all of the fracture surfaces, testing material chemistry, tensile testing material, etc., where everything looked normal, it all boiled down to the fact that there was a piece that was not replaced during routine maintenance. Bolt pattern showed me where the origin was. The part was cycled so much, it finally failed. The video of the fuselage blowing up was pretty cool…

Role models/heroes:
I don’t know if I have any heroes. I had some pretty good mentors, though. Dr. Stephen Kugle was the first professor that challenged me more than what was taught in class. Dr. Bob Woods was a great faculty advisor for Formula SAE. He taught me how to look at the overall/bigger picture. Carroll Smith was a great mentor. I┬áspoke to him a lot about engineering, jobs, etc. It was a sad day in motorsports when he passed away.

Why do you love working in STEM?
I like the problem solving aspect of things. I’m not a design engineer, but I have to know about it to do my job. I’m not a manufacturing engineer, but I need to know that too. I have to know a little or a lot about certain topics to be effective and to help people do their jobs better. Right now, I’m learning about plastics and plastic injection molding. It’s not my area of expertise, but it’s very interesting in a failure analysis aspect. I like that what I do requires me to learn things everyday.

Advice for future STEMinists?
Join the design projects while you’re in school, even if you don’t get course credit! It’s the best way to learn and apply what they teach you in class. Sometimes what they teach you is confusing unless you actually see it. I found out from classes – and a particular professor who taught dynamics – that I wanted to do failure analysis. But I found out from the Formula SAE team that I liked materials. I also found out from my first job that I didn’t want to be a design engineer. Find something that you love and stick with it. Don’t be afraid to try things just because you’re a girl; use it to your advantage.

Favorite website or app:
I think the best app, if you love music, is Shazam or Soundhound. Mostly because when I hear something I like, I can find out what it is and who sings it right away. Since I’m still in school (getting my MBA), I love Dropbox. We all use it; and having the app allows me to access what I need to.

Twitter: @tswei_chen