Browsing Tag

research

News

Shohini Ghose, Physics Feminista

Ghose argues that sexism hurts both women and science. Excluding half the potential workforce also excludes any insights they might have contributed. And without women to guide scientific inquiry and product development, their unique needs tend to be overlooked. Above all, women deserve the same access to high-paying STEM jobs and positive work environments as men.

[ via Ozy ]

News

MPs ponder why there are so few women in academic science

The Report highlights the undoubted problem of short-term contracts which are the lot of most early-career researchers (and not just in the STEM subjects). Such contracts are particularly unattractive for those who may be considering starting a family or have a partner whose job is not portable. These factors tend to hit women harder than men.

[ via The Guardian ]

News

The Elsevier Foundation honors Early Career Women Scientists from Developing Countries for Research

On February 15th, 2014, five women chemists will be honored with the Elsevier Foundation Awards for Early Career Women Scientists in the Developing World, for their research that looks to nature for ways to address cancer, malaria and other medical problems. The winning researchers, representing five regions of the developing world, are from Indonesia, Jamaica, Nigeria, Uzbekistan and Yemen.

[ via Elsevier ]

News

Women in white coats: the scientists are doing it for themselves

The current societal expectation is that women will be the primary caregiver to their children, even if they decide to continue working once they become a mother. Women are dissuaded from returning to the high pressure environment of academia, as they are told that anything that takes them away from the bench, particularly maternity leave, will reduce their success. As a result, a subtle message is being sent to the future generation of female scientists: academia is incompatible with motherhood.

[ via The Oxford Student ]

News

Diversity Correlates With Success: Gender and Synthetic Biology

We knew when we started working on this subject, that many fields in science suffer from gender bias, but because synthetic biology is a new field we expected that historical biases would not apply and that we would not observe an important gender bias. However what we found out is that the bias we observe in synthetic biology is very representative of the bias in other fields of science.

[ via Scientific American ]