We Need More Women in Aerospace

Industry’s involvement can easily be done through mentoring future leaders recognizing that their contribution is instrumental in the outcome in terms of increasing the number of women who will be involved in this industry. One particular great example is Women In Aerospace Canada, an organization dedicated to expanding women’s opportunities for leadership and professional development as well as increasing their visibility in the aerospace community is creating opportunities for both women and men to realize the possibilities in this industry.

[ via The Huffington Post ]

Sexism plagues major chemistry conference: Boycott emerges amid growing outrage

A group of female scientists promptly called for a boycott, but faced backlash from a prominent chemist who dismissed their efforts as “nonsensical” and “trendy whining about supposed ‘gender inequality.’”

[ via Salon ]

Shohini Ghose, Physics Feminista

Ghose argues that sexism hurts both women and science. Excluding half the potential workforce also excludes any insights they might have contributed. And without women to guide scientific inquiry and product development, their unique needs tend to be overlooked. Above all, women deserve the same access to high-paying STEM jobs and positive work environments as men.

[ via Ozy ]

Do You Want Your Daughter to Excel at Math and Science? Get a Little Help From GEMS

The clubs are run by volunteers and paid teachers who want to help girls become interested or stay interested in STEM fields as education or careers. Estimated at having over 8,000 members over its 20-year history, there are GEMS clubs in every state and some international clubs. The organization is expanding age groups, adding more girls, adding more countries, all while continuing the experience for its many members.

[ via Geek Dad ]

Female students start to show more interest in science and engineering

Figures for combined sciences show a 19% rise in the proportion of female students expressing enthusiasm for the subject, compared to an 11% rise for male sixth formers. Young women’s interest in mechanical engineering and electrical engineering rose by 18% and 27% respectively, compared to 10% and 13% for male students.

[ via The Guardian ]

Mars (And the Rest of Outer Space) Needs Women

As the number of young women studying in the overall STEM fields stays stubbornly low — and the quality of science education for both sexes seems to be falling — five leaders in space and tech came together to talk about the situation at the conference.

[ via Re/code ]

Chemists call for boycott over all-male speaker line up

An open letter on the website Change.org has called for a boycott of the 15th International Congress of Quantum Chemistry (ICQC), to be held in Beijing in June 2015. The move came after a list was posted on the conference website that allegedly showed no women among 24 speakers and five chairs and honorary chairs. The list, screenshots of which were seen by Nature, has since been taken down.

[ via Nature News ]

MPs ponder why there are so few women in academic science

The Report highlights the undoubted problem of short-term contracts which are the lot of most early-career researchers (and not just in the STEM subjects). Such contracts are particularly unattractive for those who may be considering starting a family or have a partner whose job is not portable. These factors tend to hit women harder than men.

[ via The Guardian ]

UCSC students design video game aimed at making astrophysics fun

Kate Compton and April Grow, both students at UCSC’s Center for Games and Playable Media, hope players will feel like they’re “farming” in space as they cultivate star gardens. In doing so, gamers will also learn about nucleosynthesis, the process by which stars forge atoms into the elements that make up the periodic table. But Stellar, which will be soon be available on Google’s Chrome Store, is first and foremost a game — and its programmers hope the approach will help spark children’s interest in science.

[ via San Jose Mercury News ]

The Elsevier Foundation honors Early Career Women Scientists from Developing Countries for Research

On February 15th, 2014, five women chemists will be honored with the Elsevier Foundation Awards for Early Career Women Scientists in the Developing World, for their research that looks to nature for ways to address cancer, malaria and other medical problems. The winning researchers, representing five regions of the developing world, are from Indonesia, Jamaica, Nigeria, Uzbekistan and Yemen.

[ via Elsevier ]