Browsing Tag

career

News

Women in white coats: the scientists are doing it for themselves

The current societal expectation is that women will be the primary caregiver to their children, even if they decide to continue working once they become a mother. Women are dissuaded from returning to the high pressure environment of academia, as they are told that anything that takes them away from the bench, particularly maternity leave, will reduce their success. As a result, a subtle message is being sent to the future generation of female scientists: academia is incompatible with motherhood.

[ via The Oxford Student ]

News

How Mentoring May Be the Key to Solving Tech’s Women Problem

One of the difficulties with keeping women in technology is that there are few female mentors for them to look to. Why is that? Well, the numbers will tell you. Only eight percent of CIOs in the U.S. are women, according to the latest Harvey Nash survey. Without women to look to at the top, many women in STEM fields get discouraged and leave the workforce. However, one group is changing that.

[ via The Huffington Post ]

News

Stopping the brain drain of women scientists

While some things have clearly changed, there is still an assumption that to be successful and climb the career ladder, the ideal academic will be full time, have no career breaks and be able to move institution or country as research opportunities arise. In fact, what is more astonishing is how well many women have done despite the constraints of a typical university career and the entrenched attitudes that have worked to men’s advantage.

[ via PhysOrg.com ]

News

Women 3.0, Taking On The Good Ol’ Boys in Tech With Style

Tech companies employ an average of 12.33 percent women engineers. The numbers for executives are even worse. As Reuters reported, “9 percent of U.S. Chief Information Officers (CIOs) are female, down from 11 percent last year, and 12 percent in 2010.” That same survey revealed that about one third of the organizations had no women at all in their IT departments.

[ via The Huffington Post ]

News

Strategy for Women in STEM

The target learning outcomes of the curriculum include problem-solving and research skills, application of knowledge in context, communication and effective teamwork. But as Vaz’s study showed, the outcomes were even more pronounced for women, who appeared to gain more in the three dozen or so aspects of personal and professional development.

Inside Higher Ed

[ via Inside Higher Ed ]

News

Something about STEM drives women out

After about the first 12 years, 50 percent of women who originally worked in STEM fields had moved to other occupations, but only about 20 percent of other professional women left their occupations over the entire three decades of the survey. The result is particularly curious because STEM jobs are often higher paid and offer better working conditions.

[ via Phys.org ]

News

Wal-Mart CIO’s Advice For Women In IT

In our culture, with the grass roots of being able to speak out on any topic, a mentoring circle lets people come together. I select them to come together. What I find is in 90 minutes, I am speaking for 10, maybe 15 minutes. It’s so much about them speaking to each other.

[ via Information Week ]

News

Lucy Rogers, STEM communicator

The key to changing minds and holding interest is to be goal-oriented, Rogers believes. This means describing career choices in terms of what people want to do rather than just as a vague ‘engineering’ catch-all.

[ via The Engineer ]

News

It’s not all about hard hats, honest: life as a female engineer

It’s the kind of job that I’d wanted since I was very young. At school, I always loved scientific subjects. Maths was one of my favourite lessons (yes, really) and solving physics problems was more like a game for me. It really annoys me not knowing how stuff works, so when I discovered that as an engineer I could find some of those answers, it seemed like the right choice.

[ via The Telegraph ]